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Basal Ganglia Function
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Basal Ganglia Function

The basal ganglia are a group of neurons (also called nuclei) located deep within the cerebral hemispheres of the brain. The basal ganglia consist of the corpus striatum (a major group of basal ganglia nuclei) and related nuclei. The basal ganglia are involved primarily in processing movement-related information.

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Prescribed Fires and Controlled Burns

The very foundation of fire ecology is based on the premise that wildland fire is neither innately destructive nor in the best interest of every forest. Fire in a forest has existed since the evolutionary beginning of forests. Fire causes change and change will have its own value with direct consequences that can be both bad or good.
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Reading Comprehension Dialogues

These reading comprehension/dialogues provide an opportunity for both reading and speaking practice. Each dialogue is also followed by a multiple choice quiz for comprehension practice. Each dialogue is listed under the appropriate level with a short introduction regarding target areas for speaking practice.
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What to Do If You Hate Your College Roommate

Frustrated with your roommate? Think he or she might be frustrated with you? Roommate conflicts are, unfortunately, part of many people's college experiences, and they can be incredibly stressful. With a little patience and communication, though, it doesn't have to be the end of the roommate-relationship.
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A Beginner's Guide to the Renaissance

The Renaissance was a cultural and scholarly movement which stressed the rediscovery and application of texts and thought from classical antiquity, occurring in Europe c. 1400 - c. 1600. The Renaissance can also refer to the period of European history spanning roughly the same dates. It's increasingly important to stress that the Renaissance had a long history of developments that included the twelfth-century renaissance and more.
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Feudalism - A Political System of Medieval Europe and Elsewhere

Feudalism is defined by different scholars in different ways, but in general, the term refers to a sharply hierarchical relationship between different levels of landowning classes. Key Takeaways: Feudalism Feudalism is a form of political organization with three distinct social classes: king, nobles, and peasants.
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Crescents - Moon-Shaped Prehistoric Stone Tools

Crescents (sometimes called lunates) are moon-shaped chipped stone objects which are found fairly rarely on Terminal Pleistocene and Early Holocene (roughly equivalent to Preclovis and Paleoindian) sites in the Western United States. Typically, crescents are chipped from cryptocrystalline quartz (including chalcedony, agate, chert, flint and jasper), although there are examples from obsidian, basalt and schist.
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The Religious Right

The movement generally referred to in the U.S. as the Religious Right came of age in the late 1970s. While it's extremely diverse and shouldn't be characterized in simple terms, it's an ultraconservative religious response to the sexual revolution. It's a response to events that are seen by Religious Right proponents as being connected to the sexual revolution.
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What to Include in a Student Portfolio

Student portfolios are educational tools teachers use to create alternative assessments in the classroom. Including the right items in student portfolios are important, but before you decide on the items, review the basic steps for getting started, creating student portfolios as well as their purpose.
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Maya Bloodletting Rituals - Ancient Sacrifice to Speak to the Gods

Bloodletting-cutting part of the body to release blood-is an ancient ritual used by many Mesoamerican societies. For the ancient Maya, bloodletting rituals (called ch'ahb ' in surviving hieroglyphs) were a way that Maya nobles communicated with their gods and royal ancestors. The word ch'ahb' means "penance" in the Mayan Ch'olan language, and may be related to the Yukatekan word ch'ab', meaning "dripper/dropper.
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Learn Whether or Not Gloves Help Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Wearing gloves may or may not help carpal tunnel syndrome, which is commonly caused by repetitive stress injury to the wrist. They won't cure it, to be sure. Carpal tunnel syndrome is basically a swelling around or compression of the carpal tunnel inside the hand that presses on the median nerve at the wrist.
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Y-DNA Testing for Genealogy

Y-DNA testing looks at the DNA in the Y-chromosome, a sex chromosome that is responsible for maleness. All biological males have one Y-chromosome in each cell and copies are passed down (virtually) unchanged from father to son each generation. How It's Used Y-DNA tests can be used to test your direct paternal lineage-your father, your father's father, your father's father's father, etc.
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Littering Is Everyone's Problem

Environmentalists consider littering a nasty side effect of our convenience-oriented disposable culture. Just to highlight the scope of the problem, California alone spends $28 million a year cleaning up and removing litter along its roadways. And once trash gets free, wind and weather move it from streets and highways to parks and waterways.
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Modern Science and the Plague of Athens

The plague of Athens took place between the years 430-426 BC, at the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War. The plague killed an estimated 300,000 people, among which was the Greek statesman Pericles. It is said to have caused the death of one in every three people in Athens, and it is widely believed to have contributed to the decline and fall of classical Greece.
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Westminster College, Salt Lake City Admissions

Westminster College Description: Westminster College in Salt Lake City (not to be confused with the Westminster Colleges in Missouri and Pennsylvania) is a private liberal arts college located in the historical Sugar House neighborhood on the eastern side of the city. Westminster takes pride in being the only liberal arts college in Utah.
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Broomcorn (Panicum miliaceum) - History of Domestication

Broomcorn or broomcorn millet ( Panicum miliaceum ), also known as proso millet, panic millet, and wild millet, is today primarily considered a weed suitable for bird seed. But it contains more protein than most other grains, is high in minerals and easily digested, and has a pleasant nutty taste. Millet can be ground up into flour for bread or used as a grain in recipes as a replacement for buckwheat, quinoa or rice.
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Renaissance Architecture and Its Influence

The Renaissance describes an era from roughly 1400 to 1600 AD when art and architectural design returned to the Classical ideas of ancient Greece and Rome. In large part, it was a movement spurred on by the advances in printing by Johannes Gutenberg in 1440. The wider dissemination of Classical works, from the ancient Roman poet Virgil to the Roman architect Vitruvius, created a renewed interest in the Classics and a humanist way of thinking-Renaissance Humanism-that broke with long-standing medieval notions.
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University of Evansville Admissions

University of Evansville Description: The University of Evansville is a small, private, comprehensive university affiliated with the Methodist Church. The 70-acre campus is located in Evansville, the third largest city in Indiana. Students come from roughly 40 states and 50 countries, and the university prides itself on the strength of its international efforts.
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What Are the Negative Health Effects of Red Meat?

It has been known for a while that the saturated animal fat in red meat contributes to heart disease and atherosclerosis. Recent research also shows red meat is thought to increase the risks of rheumatoid arthritis and endometriosis. There is good evidence that eating red meat may be a probable cause of colorectal cancer.
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The African Berbers

The Berbers, or Berber, has a number of meanings, including a language, a culture, a location, and a group of people: most prominently it is the collective term used for dozens of tribes of pastoralists, indigenous people who herd sheep and goats and live in northwest Africa today. Despite this simple description, Berber ancient history is truly complex.
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How to Play Liar's Dice

Throughout China, Liar's Dice (說謊者的骰子, shuōhuǎng zhě de shǎizi ) is played during holidays, especially Chinese New Year. The fast-paced game can be played by two or more players and the number of rounds is limitless. Players usually agree to a predetermined number of rounds or set a time limit but none of that is set in stone; new players and additional rounds can be added as the game goes along.
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